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Equality Now

Equality Now creates linkages between the voices and experiences of women and girls and the governmental, community and private institutions that govern their lives; mobilizes national and international public pressure on behalf of their stated needs; and brings together individuals and organizations sharing this common vision of human equality.

Global Fund for Women

We are a global champion for the human rights of women and girls. We use our powerful networks to find, fund, and amplify the courageous work of women who are building social movements and challenging the status quo. By shining a spotlight on critical issues, we rally communities of advocates who take action and invest money to empower women.

Humanity & Inclusion

Humanity and Inclusion is an independent and impartial international aid organization working in situations of poverty and exclusion, conflict and disaster. Working alongside persons with disabilities and other vulnerable groups, our action and testimony are focused on responding to their essential needs, improving their living conditions and promoting respect for their dignity and their fundamental rights.

Worldreader

Worldreader is on a mission to bring digital books to every child and her family, so that they can improve their lives. The increasing ubiquity and diminishing costs of digital technology enable us to solve these problems in a simple and straight-forward way. Using e-readers, mobile phones and other digital technology, we reach readers in 37 countries, providing them with over 6,000 book titles in 23 languages. We work with 140 publishers to acquire and digitize the best, most relevant content for our readers; 70% of our library comes from African and Indian publishers. Since 2010, we have made it possible for over 200,000 people to read 1.7 million books and our data shows this work has had significant impact. Students in our e-reader programs make more progress in oral reading fluency than those in neighboring schools, and girls in Worldreader’s school-based programs outpace their peers by a factor of three to five, closing a gender achievement gap. Through these efforts and our partnerships with the private sector, teachers, education experts, and other organizations, we continue to work towards a world in which every child and her family have the books they need to improve their lives, the practice of reading is commonplace, and where illiteracy is a thing of the past.

Sisterhood Agenda

Sisterhood Agenda is an award-winning, tax-exempt nonprofit organization that creates and implements activities for women and girls around the globe for education, support and empowerment. Sisterhood Agenda promotes positive social change and has over 6,000 global partners in 36 countries. Global partners create an extensive sisterhood network to increase local organization capacity and unite women and girls. Sisterhood Agenda's SEA (Sisterhood Empowerment Academy), based in the U.S. Virgin Islands, attracts international participants. On global and local levels, Sisterhood Agenda addresses social, health, economic and cultural issues facing women and girls to promote positive life outcomes. Sisterhood Agenda's social impact is expanded through partnerships with agencies, individuals and businesses throughout the United States, Canada, Europe, India, the Caribbean, United Kingdom, Africa, Australia, and other geographic regions. Sisterhood Agenda maintains its social networking sites and blog at www.sisterhoodagenda.com.

Lawyers for Justice in Libya

LFJL is a non-governmental organisation and charity, incorporated for the public benefit in order to defend and promote human rights in Libya. LFJL was established in response to the 17 February 2011 uprising in Libya. We exist, work for, and are passionate about the promotion of justice, human rights, and democracy in Libya. We seek to promote and nurture the legal profession and civil society in Libya. LFJL's growing team works between Tripoli and London. We speak seven languages, are qualified in seven jurisdictions, and are graduates from the University of Oxford, the Sorbonne, the School of Oriental and African Studies and Stanford University. Our team has expertise in international human rights law; the law of armed conflict and humanitarian law; international criminal law and tribunals; international arbitration; transitional justice; finance law; and oil, gas and environmental law. We maintain a growing network of talented Libyan lawyers and activists, currently in excess of 70 individuals and organisations, who work on the ground across all regions in Libya. We also work closely with the Coalition of Libyan Human Rights Organisations (the Coalition), which we brought together in order to share knowledge and engage in joint international advocacy activities. Together we were the first Libyan civil society organisations to participate in Libya's Universal Periodic Review at the UN Human Rights Council. We regularly work with national, regional and international stakeholders, including the International Criminal Court; the International Committee of the Red Cross; the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights; the United Nations Support Mission in Libya; REDRESS; Amnesty International; Article 19; Human Rights Watch; and the International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH). Our core values are independence and integrity and we strive for excellence in all areas of our work. We conduct our activities with compassion and understanding, seeing the survivors of human rights abuses that we work with as individuals, not causes. We advocate our positions with independence from interference which would otherwise prejudice our core values and our credibility. Our programmes are: Transitional Justice LFJL's Transitional Justice Programme seeks to carry out activities that ensure that victims of human rights abuses realise their right to know the truth, see those responsible held to account, and receive adequate reparations. It is based on the understanding that without these rights of victims to truth, accountability and redress being achieved, peaceful coexistence between communities in Libya will be unable to take root. The Transitional Justice Programme works with actors in Libya to document a broad range of human rights violations, including human rights abuses that took place during the 2011 uprising and the ongoing human rights violations against migrants. The programme ensures that these documents are stored securely so that they may be used as evidence in future truth, reconciliation and accountability efforts. The programme also seeks to create space for discussions and debates not currently being had regarding transitional justice issues such as those related to the right to reconciliation of communities perceived as being 'against' the uprising who are currently severely marginalised. We also advocate for the implementation of laws and policies that support a transitional justice mechanism that is objective, nonpolitical and inclusive of all groups and communities in Libya. Legal Reform Key aspects of Libya's legal system need urgent reform to ensure conformity with international human rights standards. Laws that threaten human rights including the right to non-discrimination, freedom from torture and ill-treatment, freedom of expression and the right to a fair trial remain in place. Laws issued since 2011 have frequently failed to provide adequate protection for prevalent human rights concerns. The Legal Reform Programme addresses such weaknesses and gaps in Libyan law by supporting in-depth research and analysis of Libya's legal system in order to promote compliance with international human rights standards. It aims to raise awareness of legal issues currently affecting human rights in Libya and works to effect change to draft legislation dealing with human rights concerns. The programme also works to ensure that Libya has ratified key international human rights treaties and implemented them at the domestic level. Strategic Litigation Litigation is one of the key ways that LFJL is able to use its legal expertise to assist those who have suffered human rights violations, and in doing so seeks to prevent such violations occurring again in the future by bringing an end to the current climate of impunity. Litigation can provide avenues for redress, rehabilitation and reparations for survivors of human rights abuses and hold those responsible to account. LFJL uses litigation to pursue significant changes to the law, policy and public opinion, so that stronger human rights protections will become established in Libya. The Strategic Litigation Programme works with lawyers from across Libya to document, monitor and report on violations and abuses among them are against migrants, internally displaced persons, minorities and on the basis of gender. LFJL also assists them in undertaking their own domestic, regional and international human rights litigation. As the judiciary in Libya currently faces challenges and severe restrictions to its ability to consider human rights cases, the programme seeks to challenge impunity for rights violations through international human rights mechanisms. LFJL has built cases to litigate before regional and international mechanisms. LFJL has brought cases to the African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights related to torture and ill-treatment and to the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention. LFJL's litigation activities also aim to support the International Criminal Court's investigations, with a current focus on abuses against migrants in Libya. While building a case, LFJL provides legal support and referrals to other services such as health services to survivors suffering from physical and mental harm. Advocacy The Advocacy Programme works to ensure that core human rights concerns are a priority consideration during the decision making processes of domestic, regional and international institutions. Without such engagement there is a risk that temporary solutions to systemic problems devalue human rights and undermine much needed efforts towards accountability for violations. LFJL currently advocates in key capitals around the world and before the UN Human Rights Council, the African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights and the Assembly of State Parties to the International Criminal Court to inform activities and mandates related to Libya. As well as undertaking its own advocacy, the Advocacy Programme empowers national NGOs so that they may also engage in such forums and pursue joint advocacy targets. Under this programme, LFJL brought together and trained Libya's first human rights coalition to carry out advocacy at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva. Human Rights Education The Human Rights Education Programme addresses the lack of public awareness of human rights principles and the value they offer. It also attempts to tackle key issues that are linked to the widespread culture of accepting human rights violations including torture and ill-treatment and discrimination on the basis of race, ethnicity and gender at the societal level. In addition to engaging the public on human rights issues, the Human Rights Education Programme seeks to develop the skillset of Libya's activists and lawyers currently collaborating with LFJL's programmes through high level training events including on documentation, monitoring and reporting. To date, LFJL has trained over 150 lawyers, activists, journalists, judges and medical professionals that are actively engaged in advancing human rights. The programmes also seeks to engender the next generation of human rights activists by actively engaging Libya's youth in discussions and capacity building concerning the importance of human rights, notably through launching a summer school and by developing a national human rights curriculum to be implemented across Libya's schools.

femLENS MTU

femLENS' mission is to visually educate and make technologically aware the most vulnerable and resourceless women of our society through documentary photography made accessible by mobile phone cameras and cheaper point and shoot cameras.

The International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association (ILGA)

1. To act as a leading organisation and a global voice for the rights of those who face discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression and/or sex characteristics (SOGIESC). 2. To work towards achieving equality, freedom and justice for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersex people through advocacy, collaborative actions, and by educating and informing relevant international and regional institutions as well as governments, media and civil society. 3. To empower our members and other human rights organisations in promoting and protecting human rights, irrespective of people's sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression and/or sex characteristics and to facilitate cooperation and solidarity among ILGA regions and members. 4. To promote the diversity and strengths of persons of diverse SOGIESC around the world.

Teen International Media Exchange

In the wake of September 11, 2001, a group of Los Angeles media instructors and professionals gathered to discuss the tragedy. They were determined to “go global” and make a major, long-term impact on the world community.The Teen International Media Exchange (TIME) was born, and found a home at the Media Academy at Grover Cleveland High School in Reseda, CA, where two of the founders teach.Today, TIME is a non-profit organization with an explicit mission: to empower the energy of teenagers and the dynamic power of the media to create a peaceful, cooperative world community.

International Society For The Prevention Of Child Abuse And Neglect

ISPCAN’S MISSION IS TO STRENGTHEN THE WORK OF INDIVIDUALS AND ORGANIZATIONS TO: • PREVENT ABUSE, NEGLECT AND OTHER FORMS OF VIOLENCE AGAINST CHILDREN • PROMOTE THE WELLBEING OF CHILDREN

Women Deliver

Women Deliver is a leading global advocate that champions gender equality and the health and rights of girls and women. Our advocacy drives investment—political and financial— in the lives of girls and women. We harness evidence and unite diverse voices to spark commitment to gender equality. And we get results. Anchored in sexual and reproductive health, we advocate for the rights of girls and women across every aspect of their lives.

Fifty Shades of Aid

Fifty Shades of Aid CIC is an online community and global network that supports professional aid workers, and helps them meet the challenges that come with this line of work. We provide a protected online space in which aid workers can discuss these challenges frankly and honestly, find support from peers and access appropriate expertise. We also campaign for better safeguarding of aid staff at work. Fifty Shades of Aid CIC also provides members with additional services such as newsletters, personal action resources, support to individuals in need and access to providers of key services.